mind mapping our way to food security

Check out our wild mind map! At our last meeting, we brainstormed on some of the ways we might disentangle our community from the industrial food chain and create a more sustainable, healthy standard of living for all interested Hill residents. I organized the ideas from that Conversation and the one prior, and I created a mind map using a free online collaboration tool. Continue reading “mind mapping our way to food security”

wendell berry: in distrust of movements

“I HAVE HAD WITH MY friend Wes Jackson a number of useful conversations about the necessity of getting out of movements — even movements that have seemed necessary and dear to us — when they have lapsed into self-righteousness and self-betrayal, as movements seem almost invariably to do. People in movements too readily learn to deny to others the rights and privileges they demand for themselves. They too easily become unable to mean their own language, as when a “peace movement” becomes violent… Continue reading “wendell berry: in distrust of movements”

conversation #5—inquiry into capitalism

At last week’s meeting all participants arrived at a consensus that we should further explore the subject of capitalism at our next meeting on Wed. Nov 2. The following questions arose:

Bill Moyers on ‘Democratic Decency Defined Downward’

This post from George Zornick at The Nation is so good that I’m posting the whole thing:

Bill Moyers delivered a stirring keynote on the capture of our political system by the ultra-rich last night in Washington, at a gala honoring the fortieth anniversary of Ralph Nader’s advocacy group Public Citizen. Moyers urged people to have clarity about what has happened to American politics, and to engage in dedicated citizen action to combat it. His remarks are worth quoting at length: Continue reading “Bill Moyers on ‘Democratic Decency Defined Downward’”

“the stakes are too high for us not to make the absolute most of this moment.”

We ran into Naomi Klein at Liberty Square and asked if we could interview her. “After the march!” she called out. But after finding ourselves part of a slow-moving mass of 42,000 humans, we barely found time to get to Penn Station for our scheduled train trip to Washington, DC. Fortunately, this brief interview with Ms. Klein offers some nice insights into what makes this movement so compelling. And she offers some advice regarding the importance of making the most of this critical moment.

keith olbermann reads the first collective statement of occupy wall street

What are the occupation’s demands? Many folks we spoke with explained that making demands is ultimately disempowering because it gives the other side the power to address or ignore them as they see fit. In lieu of demands, the Occupy Wall Street folks put forth this first collective statement. Keep in mind that different occupations will most likely produce different declarations as each of the local movements is place-based, addressing needs specific to that region. Consensus will unfold organically over time.

a movement for our times

For the past week, Zoraborealis and I have witnessed the emergence of the occupation movements in Chicago, New York and Washington, DC. We’ve marched amidst tens of thousands of people from diverse backgrounds, all united in a common goal: to transform our economic and political systems so that they better address the needs of the earth and its inhabitants. Continue reading “a movement for our times”

let the journey begin!

Markopolo and Zoraborealis embark on a cross country rail trip to the Occupation of Wall Street and the Occupation of Washington. Is democracy still breathing in the USA? Stay tuned to find out. Continue reading “let the journey begin!”

conversation #2—gleanings

I have just three things to teach:
simplicity, patience, compassion.
These three are your greatest treasures.
Simple in actions and in thoughts,
you return to the source of being.
Patient with both friends and enemies,
you accord with the way things are.
Compassionate toward yourself,
you reconcile all beings in the world.
—Lao-tzu, Tao Te Ching

 

I’m going to write down some thoughts regarding the last meeting, and I encourage all of you who attended to do the same in the comments section below. You may also comment on comments. As always, please remain civil—people often let loose in an online forum. This is not that kind of forum. Continue reading “conversation #2—gleanings”

who killed economic growth?

Yes, crimes were committed, and the Wall Street criminals escaped (for now)—not only unscathed but rewarded with infuriating bonuses. But Richard Heinberg’s new book The End of Growth makes a compelling case that the real source of the economic downturn is more systemic than villainous. Our economy is based on a fantasy of infinite growth, and it clashes with the real world of finite resources. This brief 6:30 short nicely summarizes his argument. If it sparks your curiosity you’ll want to check out some excerpts from his book.