mind mapping our way to food security

Check out our wild mind map! At our last meeting, we brainstormed on some of the ways we might disentangle our community from the industrial food chain and create a more sustainable, healthy standard of living for all interested Hill residents. I organized the ideas from that Conversation and the one prior, and I created a mind map using a free online collaboration tool. Continue reading “mind mapping our way to food security”

wendell berry: in distrust of movements

“I HAVE HAD WITH MY friend Wes Jackson a number of useful conversations about the necessity of getting out of movements — even movements that have seemed necessary and dear to us — when they have lapsed into self-righteousness and self-betrayal, as movements seem almost invariably to do. People in movements too readily learn to deny to others the rights and privileges they demand for themselves. They too easily become unable to mean their own language, as when a “peace movement” becomes violent… Continue reading “wendell berry: in distrust of movements”

Shouts Out to Idyllwild

A quickie video for our homies. Several participants missed this at last week’s meeting, so I’m posting it here. In the midst of a gigantic crowd of demonstrators at New York City’s City Hall, we met a fellow who used to attend the Strawberry Creek Music Festivals. He gave a shout-out to Idyllwild residents, as did Rob and Justine whom you might recall from an earlier video. We also met with former Idyllwild resident Steven Morrison who expressed feelings of longing for his old home here on the hill.

from vietnam to wall street

We met Pat Walsh at Occupy Wall Street’s info booth. She really gave us an earful, recounting her experiences as a nurse in the Vietnam War and explaining why she traveled from her home in Colorado all the way to NYC’s Liberty Square to contribute to the OWS cause. Thanks for your compassion and commitment, Pat. And for sharing some of your story with us! Continue reading “from vietnam to wall street”

family sleepover at occupy wall street

When Zora and I first arrived at Occupy Wall Street in New York City’s Liberty Square there was nary a child to be seen. Now Parents for Occupy Wall Street are organizing a family sleepover for this Friday night. We’re with you folks in spirit!

Photo by Jessica Eve Rattner.

conversation #3—preparation— “how information can be controlled and suppressed in the corridors of power”

(seen above, Lawrence Summers takes a public nap after joining Team Obama)

A message from Conor:

Greetings my fellow concerned citizens,

Wednesday night after our meeting I came home and began reading The HuffingtonPost, I came across a story about a battle brewing between Ron Suskind and the Obama White House. Ron Suskind has written an unflattering book about the inner workings of the Obama administration. Continue reading “conversation #3—preparation— “how information can be controlled and suppressed in the corridors of power””

conversation #2—gleanings

I have just three things to teach:
simplicity, patience, compassion.
These three are your greatest treasures.
Simple in actions and in thoughts,
you return to the source of being.
Patient with both friends and enemies,
you accord with the way things are.
Compassionate toward yourself,
you reconcile all beings in the world.
—Lao-tzu, Tao Te Ching

 

I’m going to write down some thoughts regarding the last meeting, and I encourage all of you who attended to do the same in the comments section below. You may also comment on comments. As always, please remain civil—people often let loose in an online forum. This is not that kind of forum. Continue reading “conversation #2—gleanings”

the conversation begins—thomas jefferson & us

Thomas Jefferson portrait

“Every human being must be viewed according to what it is good for. For none of us, no, not one is perfect. And were we to love none who had imperfections, this world would be a desert for our love.” —Thomas Jefferson

Like many good things it started with a casual chat in a cafe. Conor and I both felt troubled by the state of the world, how it will affect the futures of our children and, for that matter, all children, and the ways in which so much of the public dialogue feels dumbed-down and irrelevant to the deeper issues at play. If democracy depends upon an informed and engaged citizenry, then we must relearn how to inform one another through open dialogue and debate. And so we decided to host a political conversation amongst people from a wide range of political leanings. And then we invited the entire town! Continue reading “the conversation begins—thomas jefferson & us”